Through Her Glass Eyes

by emilyhighfash

For my next collage project for my art course, I visited the library at my university to try to find some inspiration. I can’t believe that I have never been to the Arts floor of our library…I was in heaven! But then again, I can’t believe that I haven’t taken an art course until my 5th year in university… I was browsing the Ancient Textiles section when I turned around and saw that the Photography section was right behind me so I took a little gander through it and found this gem:

Women Seeing Women: A Pictorial History of Women’s Photography
By: Julia Margaret Cameron and Annie Leibovitz

Women Seeing Women is a breathtaking collection of photographs of women, shot by women. The photos are categorized in chronological order, starting from the 19th century  and goes up until the late 1990’s. The photographs in this collection are raw and powerful yet graceful. They speak of truth. I think Cameron and Leibovitz did a really good job at communicating the brave perspectives of the women who were behind the lenses across time.

I will be posting more of my favourite photographs from this collection, as you can see by my tabs…. Below is an open page of two photographs by Deborah Turbeville. They are titled “Steam Bath” and were featured in Vogue Italia 1984. I was immediately captivated by this particular set of photographs, especially the one on the right. There is something so intense about the woman’s eyes, I can’t pull myself away. From here I did a Google Image search on “Steam Bath by Deborah Turbeville” and went off on a 3 hour tangent of unfolding more and more of Turbeville’s work. I threw together a collection of some of my favourite pieces by this photographer. I’m absolutely obsessed with the her melancholic portrayal of women. I love the hazy surrealism and sadness and raw beauty in her photographs.One of the most striking aspects about Deborah Turbeville’s work, in my opinion, is the composition of her subjects and space, especially in her photographs of groups of people. She has an amazing eye for placement and I think half of the allure of Turbeville’s photography is in the story she tells with her composition. It’s really interesting too, to see how her work has evolved over time. It’s a bit difficult to tell the time period of some of the photographs, but I tried to place what seemed like her older work near the beginning of my collection and the newer ones near the bottom. The Valentino images are definitely her most recent work from the list I’ve compiled. I ended off with two of my favourite photographs, but they are probably not the most recent. Hope you enjoy these.

Deborah Turbeville in “Women Seeing Women” by Julia Margaret Cameron and Annie Leibovitz

Deborah Turbeville in “Women Seeing Women” by Julia Margaret Cameron and Annie Leibovitz

Deborah Turbeville in “Women Seeing Women” by Julia Margaret Cameron and Annie Leibovitz

Bonus points for composition

Deborah Turbeville for Valentino Haute Couture

Deborah Turbeville for Valentino Haute Couture

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